Michael Haller, M.D., MS-CI

Associate Professor of Pediatrics // University of Florida Medical Center
Endocrinologist // Active NIH Investigator–Type 1 Diabetes

Dr. Haller has committed his academic career to developing safe and effective therapies for the prevention and reversal of Type 1 diabetes. His research focuses on predicting, preventing, and the disease through a team approach that focuses on translating findings from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside in a timely manner. Dr. Haller has been working with SAB as a source of thymocytes to produce a fully human antithymocyte globulin that can be used in Type 1 diabetes without the side effect from using an animal antibody.


After completing his undergraduate education at Duke University, Dr. Michael Haller returned to his native Gainesville, Florida where he completed medical school, residency training in pediatrics, and fellowship training in pediatric endocrinology. He first began working in Type 1 diabetes research during his first year of medical school and has since committed his academic career to developing safe and effective therapies for the prevention and reversal of Type 1 diabetes. Dr. Haller has published over 75 manuscripts and book chapters relating to Type 1 diabetes. He is currently funded by the NIH, the JDRF and The Helmsley Trust to support his work in developing combination therapies for Type 1 diabetes.

Dr. Haller is an active investigator in the NIH funded Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet and The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in Youth (TEDDY) study. He is the PI of promising studies seeking to utilize combination therapies with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) in patients with both recent onset and established Type 1 diabetes. In addition, Dr. Haller served as the PI of a “first in man” study aimed at using autologous umbilical cord blood stem cells as a potential therapy for Type 1 diabetes.

In 2008, Dr. Haller, and his colleagues Dr. Desmond Schatz and Dr. Mark Atkinson received the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s (JDRF) highest award, the Mary Tyler Moore and S. Robert Levine Excellence in Clinical Research Award, for their team approach to developing therapies for Type 1 diabetes. Dr. Haller also received the Lawson Wilkins Clinical Scholar award, a JDRF innovative research award, a JDRF Early Career Clinically Oriented, and the ISPAD Young investigator award.